blogging


Generation Change book cover

Tengrain at Mock, Paper, Scissors was recently asked to review a book, and because the target audience was people under 30, he asked me if I wanted to take on the project. I agreed, then emailed him and a few other people about how to go about reviewing a book I didn’t like. Taking only some of their advice, this is the result.

Cassie

Generation Change by Jayan Kalathil and Melissa Bolton-Klinger fails in its attempt to encourage the Obama Generation to continue the campaign for change. Published by Skyhorse Publishing and subtitled “150 Ways We Can Change Ourselves, Our Country and Our World” this book is geared toward readers under age 30. The unsigned description on the back cover indicates that the “fun, witty, and optimistic approach [is] sure to attract readers of all ages” but the font size and writing style are more appropriate for middle-class or wealthier sixth graders. If reduced to a size 12 font, with chapter titles at size 14, the book would likely fit into 150 pages rather than the current 210.

Would you pay $12.95 to read a book that tells you to “Stay Young at Heart” and devotes a chapter to flossing? The best suggestion is #5, which encourages us to blog for good. We’re already doing that. “Find the cause that keeps you up at night and get blogging!”

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I’m a millionaire!



Not rich.  Not yet.  But I do have 1,000,000 hits on my blog!  Yay!

 

Thanks to David for letting me know.  I never keep track of these things.

I win!  Yay! Boo!

Sorry!  I really AM the worst blogger ever.  In my defense, I have been finishing my sophomore year (with a 93% average in four pre-AP classes!)  traveling, doing family stuff,  working for Rick Noriega for Senate, and acquiring a new sister-in-law.

I had NO IDEA that weddings involved so much, or that kid sisters were required in order to make sure every single white ribbon was tied perfectly around every single vase, centerpiece, and everything else.  Ick!

Back to politics soon.  I promise!

Laura sent me a link to this blog, and I think it’s amazing.

Days of My Life

Talk about daily life of a teenage girl in Iraq, and days of suffering and success. My nick name will be Sunshine.

The author is my age, but lives in Mosul in Iraq. She talks about school and friends and watching movies in class, but she also talks about the dangers of living in Iraq. Here’s some of what she says that I was really impressed with:

I admire M’s courage, she’s attending school everyday, doing her homework, attending exams and taking 100%, I’d say she’s a hero because she didn’t kill herself after her mom’s death, I can’t find a word to describe her courage, her determination, I don’t know how can she handle everything.. I was there for R, Rita and their families, and I’ll be there for M and help her in every possible way, all the girls in my class are with her, in the break-time, the girls and I explain to her the lessons she missed.

I think some of the stuff she writes sounds just like me.

One of the things that makes me really proud is my blog , you know that..
When I started 3 years ago I had no idea what’s going to happen, I remember the pleasure of receiving the first encouraging comment, and in the next day I got 9 E-mails I started to jump in the middle of the living room shouting “ I GOT 9 COMMENT OH I AM FAMOUS “

I don’t know anyone who has had this experience but I can still relate. I don’t care if it is war or child abuse or having drug addicts in your family, the only way any of us survive is if we have friends who can help us through. Some of what Sunshine writes is so horrible that I can’t relate at all. And I DO know what it is like to be afraid.

On Friday morning, my mom told me that dad was asking her to take care of the kids, and his parents, I went to my room, opened my book to study but I burst into tears, and cried for long time until I was unable to open my eyes, and my book page was completely wet. I throw the book away, and kept blaming myself and cry for not doing my best to fix my relationship with dad, I was telling myself, what have I done? If something bad happens to dad, I won’t forgive myself ever, part of me was ordering me to go to my dad, apologize and make sure he forgives me for every time I was adversarial to him, for every word I said and made him upset, for every night I slept without wishing him a good night, but I couldn’t, I was tight, I don’t know why..

I suffered from horrible headache and insomnia, I want my dad to see me publishing my first book, graduating from the best collage, being successful person in my life, and more important I want to be so nice to him and make him forget everything, every disparity we had, & every time we argued, I hope he’ll forget those memories.. and be proud of the girl he raised, although he tells me he’s proud but I want to make him even more prouder..

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According to the New York Times, more teenage girls are blogging. The author of the article seems confused or surprised by this since “THE prototypical computer whiz of popular imagination — pasty, geeky, male — has failed to live up to his reputation.” Ack! Whose imagination?

animated pencil smileyThe Times describes many girls who have glittery sites (just like my about page and my valentine’s day post!) but they don’t write much about girls who blog about important things like news and politics.

Vanessa at Feministing wrote about the Times article, criticizing their portrayal of teenage girls. She encourages the Times to look for more content from girls.

huggy kiss teddy bear animatedWell some of us do all of the above! We blog about important things in the national news and we blog about the Dixie Chicks. We analyze politics and conduct interviews and find glittery valentine teddy bears.

If you want to read some good writing from teenage girls AND guys, check out these sites:

YOUTHinkLeft

Our Descent Into Madness

Peace Takes Courage

ThinkYouth

Politics, real life, and puppies. Cute fonts even on my site! Live with it NYT!