democrats


arail.gif

cp7f630f3f2236f945c55474d906c672aa.gif

cp08ee90c614adbb33c28d9b10d9855632.jpg

lbs080308.gif

lcrmlu080308.gif

ljd080228.gif

lta080306.gif

Super delegates each have the same voting power as regular delegates. And each of the regular delegates represents about 10,000 actual democratic voters. So …. how can someone who was too young to vote in the 2004 election be old enough to be a super delegate?

Well, there is at least one, Jason Rae, a 21 year old college student from Wisconsin.

Click here for the video.

Huffington Post also has a story on this.

Hillary’s first public rally in Texas is this evening in El Paso. Our primary is March 4, so learn about the candidates and plan to vote!

Clinton launches Texas tour in El Paso

Locked in a tight battle for the Democratic presidential nomination, Hillary Clinton will kick off the Texas portion of her campaign in El Paso today with a free public rally at the Don Haskins Center, followed by a private $1,000-per-person fundraiser.

“The excitement is obvious,” said U.S. Rep. Silvestre Reyes, D-Texas, one of the organizers of Clinton’s El Paso visit.

The Clinton rally begins at 6 p.m. today She is scheduled to speak at about 6:30 p.m. However, to accommodate the expected large crowd, the doors at the Don Haskins Center will open at 4:30 p.m., officials said.

Among those who plan to attend the rally is West Side voter Yolanda Uranga. She’s going along with her husband and several friends.

“We’ve got to have a good turnout because she needs us right now,” Uranga said.

Reyes urged people to show up early because the arena holds 12,000 people, and entrance is on a first-come, first-serve basis.

“In 1996 the Clintons had a rally at the airport with 44,000 people, and what people forget is that we turned away another 12,000 people,” Reyes said. “That’s how much interest there is.”El Pasoan Rick LoBello, who is helping organize Illinois Sen. Barack Obama’s presidential campaign in El Paso, said some Obama supporters will have their own cordial rally outside the Don Haskins Center today.

“Just like there is a lot of support for Clinton in El Paso and it is going to show tomorrow, there is a lot of support for Obama, and if he ever comes to El Paso it will show, too,” he said.

Clinton and Obama are locked in a tight race for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination. Among the states left to vote is Texas, which conducts its primary on March 4.

Reyes said former President Bill Clinton is also expected to visit El Paso in the next two weeks.

Ramon Bracamontes may be reached at rbracamontes@elpasotimes.com; 546-6142.

In tonight’s New Hampshire primary, Hillary Clinton has just been named the winner, but she is only a little bit ahead of Barack Obama. Here are the results as of now:

ELECTION RESULTS

New Hampshire

Democrats Vote %
Clinton 67,828 39%
Obama 62,736 36
Edwards 29,126 17
Richardson 8,212 5
Kucinich 2,478 1
Gravel 240 0
66% reporting

There are 30 delegates from New Hampshire, 22 of which are pledged to specific candidates. So Clinton gets 39% of 22 votes, or 8.58 delegates. Obama’s share is 7.92 delegates and Edwards gets 3.74 delegates. Richardson would receive 1.1 delegates and Gravel and Kucinich none. If all are rounded, then Clinton gets 9, Obama 8, Edwards 4 and Richardson 1.

For Hillary it is great because she was third (by a tiny percentage) in Iowa and because she was not predicted to have this many votes or to win in New Hampshire. But it is not a blow-out. And the race is very far away from being over.

OK, he didn’t get the biggest percentage of delegates from the caucuses, but he did win by beating Hillary.  He also showed that people want change and that you can get a lot of votes without having to spend zillions of dollars.

Congratulations Mr. Edwards!

Here is his campaign website.

Corporations can be very good for a country because they employ people, create things, sell things, and provide services. But there can be problems when corporations have too much influence over government and when they refuse to negotiate with unions or use union workers. John Edwards is the democratic candidate who is talking the most about corporate greed and the problems that it can cause. Here’s part of an article from Huffington Post that explains what he said in Iowa on Friday.

While Edwards has consistently campaigned on an economically populist program, his speech today in Dubuque was marked by a noticeable ratcheting up and radicalization of his critique of corporate wealth and power.

“Why on earth would we expect the corporate powers and their lobbyists, who make billions by selling out the middle-class, to just give up their power because we ask them nicely?” Edwards asked. He made no mention of rivals Barack Obama or Hillary Clinton in today’s speech; in the past, he has slammed Clinton for being too indebted to powerful Washington lobbies.

Edwards is in the midst of a final 38-county push to win next Thursday’s Iowa caucuses. Even his own supporters will concede that taking Iowa is a do-or-die must for a campaign running third in national polls, but in a virtual dead heat in the Hawkeye State with rivals Clinton and Obama.

Nestled on the gritty Illinois border, Dubuque has been hit hard by the collapse in American manufacturing jobs and offers itself as a perfect venue for Edwards’ message of economic fairness. The local Flexsteel plant has lost about two-thirds of its 800 jobs over the past decade. Paper maker Georgia Pacific, another big employer in town, has also been hit hard by job exports.

“Iowa has lost twice as many jobs to unfair trade deals than it’s won in the so-called technological revolution,” Edwards adviser Dave “Mudcat” Saunders told the HuffPost before today’s event started. “What kind of revolution is that?” Saunders said Edwards would stay on his message of opposing “unchecked greed” and that it was a theme that resonated deeply throughout the state.

 

So …. If half the republican people want us to withdraw troops from Iraq, we can assume that even more of the democratic people want to withdraw troops. So when will the politicians in Washington know what the people know? When will they listen? When will they start a withdrawal?

This is from ThinkProgress:

51 percent:

Number of Republicans in Iowa who “favor a withdrawal of all United States military from Iraq within the next six months.” Just 39 percent are against a withdrawal. (via Atrios)

cartoons_081807_c.jpg

cartoons_081807_d.jpg

Democratic presidential hopeful New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson responds to a question about NAFTA during a presidential forum hosted by the AFL-CIO at Soldier Field in Chicago, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2007. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

 

AP Photo: Democratic presidential hopeful New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson responds to a question about NAFTA during…

The mainstream media makes it seem like Clinton and Obama are the only Democratic candidates, but there are a lot of them, and some say some pretty good stuff. Here’s some of what Governor Bill Richardson from New Mexico has been saying:

“I believe that school reform should improve schools,” he said. “But our nation’s school reform has made our schools look more like reform schools, with all the mindless testing and bureaucratic rules and regulations.”

Richardson ticked through his accomplishments as governor, including his Making Schools Work plan. That effort addresses not only classroom instruction but health and nutrition, parental involvement and clean schools.

“Our children can’t learn if they aren’t healthy,” he said. “In New Mexico, we now provide access to free health insurance to every child under the age of 5. We have expanded our state immunization program. … We’ve implemented statewide breakfast programs for our neediest kids. And we’ve gotten junk food out and put physical education back in.”

He also wants to get spend more on education and less on war. He wants to get rid of No Child Left Behind and give better salaries to teachers:

Democratic presidential hopeful Bill Richardson says schools should be a higher budget priority than the war in Iraq.

“We need to get out of Iraq, where precious lives and needed dollars have been wasted,” New Mexico‘s governor said in remarks prepared for delivery Wednesday to New Hampshire educators. “We could use these resources to improve our schools and make the economy, once again, work for the middle class.”

Richardson proposed an extended school year, a longer school day and a complete repeal of President Bush‘s No Child Left Behind plan. He also pledged to seek a federal minimum wage of $40,000 for teachers. The average first-year teacher earned $31,753 in 2004-2005, according to the American Federation of Teachers’ most recent survey.

“Too often, you’ve been ignored, taken for granted, underpaid and blamed,” Richardson said in remarks obtained by The Associated Press. “It was Aristotle, 2,300 years ago, who wrote that the fate of nations depends more on educating youth than any other factor. Not the military. Not the political leadership. Not the economy.”

Which other candidates are saying important things that the media is not reporting?

Like most of my political posts, this is cross-posted at

Political Teen Tidbits and at YouThinkLeft.

Congratulations to Harry Reid and the democratic senators for finally standing up to the republicans.  Enjoy your pajama party!

Senate debating all night on Iraq


WASHINGTON
– Democrats steered the Senate into an attention-grabbing, all-night
session to dramatize opposition to the Iraq war but conceded they were
unlikely to gain the votes needed to advance troop withdrawal
legislation blocked by Republicans.

Aryeh wrote yesterday at YouThinkLeft about how Obama supported liquefied coal, which is one of the most inefficient uses of fossil fuel yet invented, and about how this will cost him among environmentally-conscious voters.

There’s better news this week out of Texas. Yes, Texas. A $20 million dollar wind power research center will be built in Corpus
Christi in order to test longer wind turbine blades and other innovations in the area of wind power.

An article from yesterday’s Dallas Star-Telegram explains that:

Texas strengthened its position as the nation’s No. 1 wind-energy state Monday when the U.S. Department of Energy selected a site near Corpus Christi for one of two $20 million research centers for next-generation wind-turbine blades.

The Lone Star Wind Alliance, which includes universities in Texas and other states as well as state agencies, has pledged $18 million to design, build and operate the research center on 22 acres in Ingleside donated by BP. The Energy Department will contribute $2 million in test equipment.

A site in Boston also was selected with a similar financial arrangement.

The centers will test blades as long as 100 meters, or about 330 feet, about 50 percent larger than the longest blades currently produced and about twice as long as the blades commonly used in new installations. The larger blades are outgrowing the research capabilities of the government’s facility in Colorado.

“These two testing facilities represent an important next step in the expansion of the competitiveness of the U.S. wind-energy industry,” Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman said in a statement. The government’s contributions are subject to congressional appropriations.

The same article also notes that the United States is far behind Europe in developing this technology, but also points out that this recent decision by the U.S. Department of energy helps Texas to strengthen “its position as the nation’s No. 1 wind-energy state“.

Every time the Bush administration has proposed and passed a new initiative, it seems that the end result is the opposite of whatever they named it to begin with. Here are a few that I came up with that turned out to serve corporate America rather than the US citizens, in spite of what the name implied.

Let’s see how many of these the Democratic congress can overturn.

Republican vocabulary chart new and revised

Chart revised 4/22/07.  Additional terms and definitions are welcome.

I would love to give you a play-by-play accounting of today’s hearings in the US Senate, but unfortunately I was sitting at a desk wasting time on the 4000th standardized test of academic career. So, the best I can offer is to tell you where you might find good coverage in case you too were unable to see the hearings.

http://www.slate.com/id/2164307/nav/tap1/ Great overview

http://www.crooksandliars.com/2007/04/19/gonzo-the-burdens-not-with-me/ A video clip of Senator Schumer asking questions

http://www.slate.com/id/2164652/pagenum/all/#page_start Good summary and a good graph that I include below

http://www.cnn.com/2005/ALLPOLITICS/01/06/gonzales.hearing/index.html CNN summary

http://thinkprogress.org/2007/04/19/sen-tom-coburn-r-ok-to-gonzales/ Video of Senator Coburn telling Gonzales he should resign.

AG chart from Senator Whitehouse

responsibility4-6-07.jpg
When I was in middle school, I got into trouble once in a while, and at detention we always had to fill out the same paper. The very first question was “Who is responsible for your behavior?” and the answer was always “I am.” Then it got into writing about what happened, how we could have handled it differently, and how it might be better handled in the future.

I would like to round up large numbers of politicians and government officials and send them to detention. Alberto Gonzales says “mistakes were made” but never answers question one. His assistant Monica Goodling won’t even answer a single question. Bush and Cheney are famous for never admitting mistakes, never apologizing, and never taking responsibility for their own behavior. John McCain “regrets” his remarks while he was in Iraq, but takes no responsibility for lying or misleading. This type of attitude would never get him released from detention: “Of course I am going to misspeak and I’ve done it on numerous occasions and I probably will do it in the future,” said McCain, according to “60 Minutes.” LINK

Newt Gingrich just “clarified” his choice of words but did not apoligize for offending Spanish speakers. If I wrote an explanation like this, I’d still be in detention days later!

“I made some comments that I recognize caused a bad feeling within the Latino community. My word choice was poor but my point was simply this: In the United States it is important to speak the English language well in order to advance and have success,” he said.

Senator Orrin Hatch lied three times in the same sentence on television the other day, and then avoided Rachel Maddow’s questions about it. After she publicized an open letter to him, he sent a letter to NBC saying that he “misspoke” and that he regrets “making the error” but takes no responsibility for lying or for waiting three days to reply to Rachel Maddow.

Mostly these are Republicans, but Democrats can have this problem as well. Hillary Clinton won’t admit that her vote for the Iraq invasion was a mistake.

Dear politicians,

Who is responsible for your behavior?

Sincerely,

Cassie

Also posted at YouThinkLeft

YouThinkLeft logo


p2110010.jpg Today I was with hundreds of other people protesting against the governor’s plan to use 9 additional power plants for coal. There were people of all different ages, and a lot of people brought their dogs. They had different kinds of political music there and lots of speeches. One was by a state senator, one by a pastor, one by a doctor, and a few by high school and college kids. Here are some pictures. I wrote about the rally last week and you can read that post here. (Thanks Betsy for taking photos!)

MONDAY UPDATE: There is a story and pictures about the protest in today’s Austin-American Statesman.

p2110015.JPG

p2110006.JPG

p2110007.jpg p2110008.jpgdenying.jpg

p2110020.jpg

p2110025.jpg p2110030.jpg

p2110029_1.jpgp2110017.JPG

I’m working on a new story about the State of Texas not giving enough money to the schools, but in the meantime, some cartoons!

ljd070209.gif

frontline1.jpg

cp.jpg

sb020707.jpg

sticker.jpg

sm020707.jpg

Next Page »