feminism


President Obama got in a lot of trouble this week when the press took a still picture from a video and made it seem like he was looking at a 16 or 17 year old girl’s ass in a tight dress. A few comments on this.

  • That’s NOT what he was looking at. Watch the whole video.

US Magazine says this:

Pictures can be deceiving.

Yesterday, a photo surfaced of President Barack Obama seemingly checking out the backside of a 17-year-old junior delegate at the G-8 summit in Italy.

But new video tells a different story.

See Obama’s “Just Like Us” moments.

It appears Obama wasn’t sneaking a peak; instead, he was just helping another young delegate down the stairs.

But French president Nicholas Sarkozy’s intentions aren’t as clear.

The Head of State — who’s married to former model Carla Bruni — keeps his face drawn toward the 17-year-old.

  • I am a 17 year old girl and I know that if I wear sexy clothes and walk a certain way, MOST men will look at me. It’s the reason I wear short skirts some times and don’t wear them other days. So what if he DID look? Who cares? It’s not like she had an ID out that showed her age.
  • Girls and women have the power to dress the way we want to dress in the United States. And be who we want to be. We don’t all need image consultants, and we don’t all mind if men look at us when we walk past.
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Here are three stories involving kids and the authorities, and my opinions about all three.

When I was 14, I got into serious trouble (at home) for sending a photo of myself in a bathing suit to a good friend, and sending pics of myself fully dressed to man I knew only from the internet. I should have been in trouble. I should have gotten internet restrictions and I should have been taught why it could be a serious problem. But I am very glad I was not arrested like these kids.

Pornotots: Teens Charged With Pornography For Sharing Photos Of Themselves

300px-several_mobile_phonesProsecutors have discovered another hotbed of child pornographers: Greensburg Salem High School. Prosecutors have charged teenagers with child pornography for sharing nude and seminude pictures of themselves over cell phones. The girls are 14 or 15 and the boys are 16 or 17. Pornographers all.

Capt. George Seranko of the Greensburg Pa. Police Department explains that “It was a self portrait taken of a juvenile female taking pictures of her body, nude.” Teachers seized the cell phone and instead of just calling parents, they apparently called police as well. Additional pictures were found. The lesson, Seranko notes, is “Taking nude pictures of yourself, nothing good can come out of it.” Ok, but where to the criminal charges come into the lesson plan? It appears that turning them into felons is the way that the good people of Greensburg educate their children.

This is a national problem of teens sending semi-nude and nude pictures to friends. Should all of these children be moved into the criminal justice system?

The girls are charged with manufacturing, disseminating or possessing child pornography while the boys face charges of possession. It seems like there is a need for adult supervision at the Greensburg police and prosecution offices.

The next story is of a case that IS a problem, a case where the father should never have custody or visitation of his daughter:

Quick (depressing) hit: California man sells daughter

From the Associated Press:

Police have arrested a Greenfield man for allegedly arranging to sell his 14-year-old daughter into marriage in exchange for $16,000, 100 cases of beer and several cases of meat.Police said they only learned of the deal after the 36-year-old man went to them to get his daughter back because payment wasn’t made as promised. The man was arrested Sunday on suspicion of human trafficking.

What was that again about feminism being unnecessary? Yeah, that’s what I thought.

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Dan Solis from ThinkYouth sent me this video along with this note:

If this doesn’t get you motivated to endorse Hillary on your blog, I don’t know what will.
I gotta admit, this video made me tear up a bit. Have you seen it already?

I’ve seen the video, and I am well convinced that Hillary should make a statement with her hairstyle. So why does her hair look so flat on the video? And why should any of that mean that people should vote for her?

Vote for the candidate who will be the best president! Vote for the one who will be able to fix all the things that Bush and the Republicans broke. Don’t vote based on gender or race.

Here is my tribute to Ann Richards the week that she died.

According to the New York Times, more teenage girls are blogging. The author of the article seems confused or surprised by this since “THE prototypical computer whiz of popular imagination — pasty, geeky, male — has failed to live up to his reputation.” Ack! Whose imagination?

animated pencil smileyThe Times describes many girls who have glittery sites (just like my about page and my valentine’s day post!) but they don’t write much about girls who blog about important things like news and politics.

Vanessa at Feministing wrote about the Times article, criticizing their portrayal of teenage girls. She encourages the Times to look for more content from girls.

huggy kiss teddy bear animatedWell some of us do all of the above! We blog about important things in the national news and we blog about the Dixie Chicks. We analyze politics and conduct interviews and find glittery valentine teddy bears.

If you want to read some good writing from teenage girls AND guys, check out these sites:

YOUTHinkLeft

Our Descent Into Madness

Peace Takes Courage

ThinkYouth

Politics, real life, and puppies. Cute fonts even on my site! Live with it NYT!

I just saw this and I think it is really warped. 

Kids: The New Voice In The Abortion Debate

The bell rang and the eighth graders jumped up, eager to compare notes.

“I named my baby Kyle Patrick,” one shouted.

“Mine is Antonio!”

At the urging of an antiabortion activist, they had each pledged to “spiritually adopt” a fetus developing in an unknown woman — to name it, love it from afar and above all, pray daily that the mother-to-be would not choose abortion.

“Maybe one day you’ll get to heaven and these people will come running to you . . . and say, ‘We’re all the little children you saved,’ ” activist Cristina Barba said. She smiled at the students in their Catholic school uniforms. “Maybe you really can make a difference.”

Thirty-five years after Roe vs. Wade, the U.S. Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion, opponents are pouring resources into building new generations of activists. Young people are responding with passion.

Today’s students and young adults have grown up in a time when abortion was widely accessible and acceptable, and a striking number are determined to end that era.

Pew Research Center polls dating back a decade show that 18- to 29-year-olds are consistently more likely than the general adult population to favor strict limits on abortion. A Pew survey over the summer found 22% of young adults support a total ban on abortion, compared with 15% of their parents’ generation.

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Here are some suggestions for those kids that might actually be more helpful than what they are doing:

  1. Learn more about how to NOT become pregnant.  This is called sex education.  The real stuff that includes contraceptives and how to use them.  Prayer might be less effective than condoms.  Just sayin’.
  2. Help change this country so that women who want to have babies can get daycare and healthcare and jobs that pay them enough to raise the babies.
  3. Spend your time opposing war, capital punishment, drunk driving, cancer, heart disease, child abuse and all of the other things that kill people.
  4. Help get national health care for the United States so that women who know their fetus will be a baby with health problems will be more likely to choose to have the baby.
  5. Focus on the choices you want to make for yourselves, but let the rest of us make OUR own choices.

By the way, this is my “blogging for choice” post. 

In tonight’s New Hampshire primary, Hillary Clinton has just been named the winner, but she is only a little bit ahead of Barack Obama. Here are the results as of now:

ELECTION RESULTS

New Hampshire

Democrats Vote %
Clinton 67,828 39%
Obama 62,736 36
Edwards 29,126 17
Richardson 8,212 5
Kucinich 2,478 1
Gravel 240 0
66% reporting

There are 30 delegates from New Hampshire, 22 of which are pledged to specific candidates. So Clinton gets 39% of 22 votes, or 8.58 delegates. Obama’s share is 7.92 delegates and Edwards gets 3.74 delegates. Richardson would receive 1.1 delegates and Gravel and Kucinich none. If all are rounded, then Clinton gets 9, Obama 8, Edwards 4 and Richardson 1.

For Hillary it is great because she was third (by a tiny percentage) in Iowa and because she was not predicted to have this many votes or to win in New Hampshire. But it is not a blow-out. And the race is very far away from being over.

Susan Faludi’s The Terror Dream is different from any book I have read. (Disclaimer: I am not done yet, up to page 282.) It is a history book in some ways, but a few chapters remind me of the Howard Zinn U.S. History book, which explains things very differently from the books we read in school.

Faludi’s recounting of 9-11 and its effect on the United States was surprising . I started talking to my family about WHY I had not noticed these changes in our country and in the attitudes of people. They reminded me that I was only 9 years old when the attacks occurred and, at that time, I was living in a house that was sometimes full of terror without the presence of Muslim extremists. I was far more focused on fear inside my house than fear from other countries or airplane attacks. But I did often wonder if my school was a terrorist target.

That said, here are some reactions and thoughts I had about the first part of the book:
In the introduction, all of the information was new to me. I don’t remember a lot from TV around 9/11 and I never noticed that all of the heroes were shown as men and all of the victims in NY shown as women. I did not know that even though many of the New York victims left widowers behind, the media almost exclusively showed widows. My reaction to this is to be very angry that the media was more interested in a story and a point-of-view than in actual facts. I had that same anger at the media in several of the chapters, each time Faludi shows that they put more importance on the story they wanted to show than on the REAL story.
I am completely bewildered at why the media, the politicians and the important people in the country would think that the way to react to 19 terrorists blowing up planes and buildings is to think we need more stereotypical John Wayne men and virgin housewives. How does that make sense? I can understand if they said we need the air force to have better training and be ready to defend Washington. Or if they said we need to keep box cutters off airplanes. But how will it stop terrorists if some lady in Oklahoma stays home with her kids?

I think that the way the talk show hosts and the rest of media treated the women columnists was horrendous and I wonder if that still happens. Faludi writes about the lack of women (and especially liberal women) on the Sunday talk shows and in the columnist parts of the newspapers, but I also wonder if it is a coincidence that today in the progressive media, Colbert, Stewart & Olbermann are ALSO white men.

I think it is completely insane that the focus on the de-burka’d women in Afghanistan was on make-up and hairstyles and not on education, community and health.

I am 16, and I love experimenting with make-up and trying new hair-styles. But if anyone described who I really am and what I do, I hope they would focus on my other qualities and interests first. I bet that the Afghanistan women and girls feel the same.

We are still at war in Afghanistan and I don’t think it is going well. How are women doing over there now? Did their hair salons and make-up gifts make a difference? Is that what they really want for a better life?

Chapter 2: Donald Rumsfeld was supposed to be a sexy hero? GAG me! Brain bleach please! And George Bush? No Way! His leadership was reading to second graders (isn’t that a woman’s job?!?) and hugging girl and women victims. Those guys were supposed to STOP the attack and make the country safer by protecting the shipping ports, not by having photo-ops.

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